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The U.S. state of Minnesota has enacted legislation allowing investor-owned utilities to use a value of solar tariff as an alternative to net metering for DPV. This document details the methodology participating utilities will use to calculate the value of solar tariff to account for several values of DPV (including energy and its delivery, generation and transmission capacity, transmission and distribution losses, and environmental value). The methodology includes detailed example calculations for each step.
Located in Topics & Resources / Regulation & Public Policy / Regulation & Public Policy folder
Because of Jamaica’s high retail electricity prices, significant opportunity exists for DPV as an economic alternative. This paper reviews the effectiveness of Jamaica’s net billing pilot program, and identifies remaining challenges including a complex interconnection process, contractual ambiguity, and stakeholder equity concerns. The report provides several specific recommendations like shortening interconnection timelines, reducing caps on individual systems, and moving beyond a pilot phase. Many of these recommendations are applicable to other countries, particularly those with similarly high electricity rates.
Located in Topics & Resources / Regulation & Public Policy / Regulation & Public Policy folder
Recent market liberalization and energy sector reform in Mexico is pushing forward a wave of new potential for DG. This report explores how DG can fulfill many of Mexico’s energy goals. It presents specific policy options to better integrate DG as a cost-effective source of energy generation. Although specifically tailored to Mexico, many of the report’s recommendations can be applied in developing contexts.
Located in Topics & Resources / Regulation & Public Policy / Regulation & Public Policy folder
To enable informed decision-making and planning related to increasing levels of distributed PV resources, the Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative facilitates knowledge sharing among its members about distributed PV interconnection practices, research, and replicable innovations. While the Collaborative itself primarily works with utilities and other stakeholders in the United States, its website hosts a collection of presentations, webinars, and reports that provide more broadly applicable information and case studies on interconnection practices.
Located in Integration Topics / Distributed Generation / Distributed Generation folder
The amount of time required to complete the distributed PV interconnection process can be a significant driver of interconnection costs to PV project developers, utilities, and local permitting authorities. Using data from over 30,000 residential and small commercial systems, this report provides insights from the United States (both nationally and in five states with active solar markets) on the length of time needed to interconnect and deploy distributed PV. The report assesses the number of business days required to 1) apply for and receive utility interconnection review and approval; 2) construct the PV system; 3) pass final local jurisdictional building permit inspection and submit permission-to-operate paperwork to the utility; and 4) receive permission to operate from the utility. It also provides insights on some of the drivers of the interconnection process timeline, which can be used to inform the development of interconnection procedures.
Located in Integration Topics / Distributed Generation / Distributed Generation folder
Traditional interconnection processes evaluate the impacts of a given distributed generator to safety, reliability, and power quality after an interconnection request is received. This concept note introduces “Integrated Distribution Planning,” an alternative, emerging methodology designed to enable distributed PV. In the Integrated Distributed Planning concept, utilities or distribution system operators proactively study the hosting capacity of distribution circuits, the ability of these distribution circuits to accommodate growth in distributed generation, and any necessary infrastructure upgrades, all in advance of receiving interconnection requests from generators.
Located in Integration Topics / Distributed Generation / Distributed Generation folder
Standard IEEE 1547 is an example of an interconnection standard (commonly used in North American power systems) providing technical rules for interconnecting distributed generation resources with the electric grid. The standard’s guide introduces the background and rationale for the technical requirements, facilitates use of the standard by characterizing distributed resource technologies and related interconnection issues, and provides approaches and information to support interconnection and implementation. The standard was updated in 2014 with an amendment providing existing information on voltage, voltage regulation, and frequency.
Located in Integration Topics / Distributed Generation / Distributed Generation folder
UL 1741 provides certification requirements for distributed generator equipment that operates according to the parameters established in IEEE 1547. The standard is used together with IEEE 1547 to provide comprehensive requirements for distributed generation projects.
Located in Integration Topics / Distributed Generation / Distributed Generation folder
The U.S. state of Minnesota has enacted legislation that allows investor-owned utilities to use a Value of Solar tariff as an alternative to net metering for distributed PV. This document details the methodology participating utilities will use to calculate the Value of Solar tariff in order to account for several values of distributed PV (including energy and its delivery, generation and transmission capacity, transmission and distribution losses, and environmental value). The methodology includes detailed example calculations for each step.
Located in Integration Topics / Distributed Generation / Distributed Generation folder
This report describes the state-of-the-art with respect to variable generation integration, mostly focused on the United States but also providing a few international examples where particularly relevant. The report is predominantly based on an extensive literature review with input from General Electric (GE) and PJM. Pages 97–119 focus on forecasting.
Located in Integration Topics / Forecasting / Forecasting folder
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