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Germany leads the world in deployment of DPV, with PV generation contributing approximately 40% of peak power demand during some hours of the year. This article outlines the impacts of high PV deployment in Germany on grid stability and power flows in the transmission and distribution system. It also highlights practical solutions that Germany has implemented to support frequency and voltage control and reduce congestion, and suggests new voltage-control strategies.
Located in Topics & Resources / Grid Planning, Integration, & Operations / Grid Planning, Integration, & Operations folder
High penetration of DPV often leads to the infamous “duck curve,” the formation of two daily peaks in the morning and evening when PV is not available. This easy to read report assesses a variety of options to mitigate the “duck curve” from targeted efficiency, time of use rate design, storage, demand response, balancing, and complementing DPV with peak-oriented renewables. Implantation of these recommendations flattens the demand curve, allowing for additional DPV.
Located in Topics & Resources / Grid Planning, Integration, & Operations / Grid Planning, Integration, & Operations folder
The U.S. state of Minnesota has enacted legislation allowing investor-owned utilities to use a value of solar tariff as an alternative to net metering for DPV. This document details the methodology participating utilities will use to calculate the value of solar tariff to account for several values of DPV (including energy and its delivery, generation and transmission capacity, transmission and distribution losses, and environmental value). The methodology includes detailed example calculations for each step.
Located in Topics & Resources / Regulation & Public Policy / Regulation & Public Policy folder
Estimating the benefits and costs of DPV helps power system stakeholders evaluate appropriate regulatory measures and compensation programs for DPV. To inform these decisions, this report describes current and potential future methods, data, and tools to estimate the benefits and costs of DPV from the utility or electricity-generation system perspective. Although the report is explicitly written in the context of informing estimation of DPV costs and benefits to the United States electricity system, it provides insights relevant to power systems around the world.
Located in Topics & Resources / Regulation & Public Policy / Regulation & Public Policy folder
Utilities worldwide are concerned about the financial impact of increasing DPV adoption among their retail customers. This report analyzes the impact of DPV deployment on distribution utility revenues and retail electricity tariffs in Thailand. It provides policymakers, utilities, and other energy practitioners a real-world example of how DPV affects certain stakeholders.
Located in Topics & Resources / Regulation & Public Policy / Regulation & Public Policy folder
Because of Jamaica’s high retail electricity prices, significant opportunity exists for DPV as an economic alternative. This paper reviews the effectiveness of Jamaica’s net billing pilot program, and identifies remaining challenges including a complex interconnection process, contractual ambiguity, and stakeholder equity concerns. The report provides several specific recommendations like shortening interconnection timelines, reducing caps on individual systems, and moving beyond a pilot phase. Many of these recommendations are applicable to other countries, particularly those with similarly high electricity rates.
Located in Topics & Resources / Regulation & Public Policy / Regulation & Public Policy folder
Ancillary service market designs may require changes in systems with greater penetration of variable RE, particularly wind. This paper explores design considerations that take into account economics and engineering. The authors examine current market design, services pricing and cost allocation, changes to existing designs, and the potential for new designs. The report focuses on load following, frequency response, inertial response, and reactive power/voltage control.
Located in Topics & Resources / Ancillary Services / Ancillary Services folder
This report first provides a characterization of the various types of reserves, followed by a summary of how reserves are applied internationally currently, and how reserves could be managed in the future. The purpose of the assessment is to understand differences and commonalities between practices and to suggest options for improved practices, especially under higher variable RE penetration scenarios.
Located in Topics & Resources / Ancillary Services / Ancillary Services folder
This is the 8th annual report from the United States Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on demand response and advanced metering in the United States, based on publicly available information and interviews with market participants and industry partners. The assessment reviews penetration rates of advanced metering and communications technologies; existing demand response and time-based rate programs; annual resource contributions from demand resources; the potential for demand response as a quantifiable, reliable resource for regional planning; steps that have been taken in regional transmission planning and operations to ensure demand resources are provided equitable treatment as a quantifiable, reliable resource; and regulatory barriers to improved customer participation in demand response programs.
Located in Topics & Resources / Demand Response and Storage / Demand Response and Storage Folder
This report provides a comprehensive examination of market and policy barriers that hinder the use of demand response resources to provide bulk power system services (including ancillary services) in U.S. energy markets. The report introduces a typology that identifies barriers (e.g., bulk power system service definitions, revenue availability) according the relevant power system entities (e.g., balancing area authorities, investor-owned utilities, end-use consumers) that are responsible for and/or affected by the barrier. It also identifies actions required to overcome each barrier. In order to illustrate the differences in and approaches to addressing barriers among various wholesale and retail market designs, four regions are explored as case studies: Colorado, Texas, Wisconsin, and New Jersey.
Located in Topics & Resources / Demand Response and Storage / Demand Response and Storage Folder
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